Prophet 3: Empire

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8.0 Overall Score
Story: 8/10
Art: 8/10

Weird fun

Very loose narrative is often open to interpretation

 

Comic Info

Comic Name:  Prophet (Volume 4)

Publisher:  Image Comics

Writer:  Brandon Graham/Giannis Milonogiannis/Simon Roy

Artist:  Simon Roy/Giannis Milonogiannis/Malachi Ward/Matt Sheean/Zachary Baldus/Aaron Conley/Fil Barlow/Jim Rugg/Bayard Baudoin

# of Issues:  6

Release Date:  2014

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Prophet (4) #35

Reprints Prophet (4) #32 and #34-38 (January 2013-August 2013).  Brain-Mother continues to rule the John Prophets, but the arrival of Newfather could mean change.  Newfather finds himself in contact with Troll who also is working with Old John Prophet to help combat a threat that could destroy the entire empire…might force Newfather and his allies to make a decision about their place among Brain-Mother’s ranks.

Written by Bradon Graham, Simon Roy, and Giannis Milonogiannis, Prophet 3:  Empire is the follow-up to Prophet 2:  Brothers.  The collection features art by Simon Roy, Giannis Milonogiannis, Malachi Ward, Matt Sheean, Zachary Baldus, Aaron Conly, Fil Barlow, Jim Rugg, and Bayard Baudoin.  The collection does not feature Prophet (4) #33 (January 2013) which was collected in the previous trade paperback.

Prophet continues to just be a weird, weird series.  The story is a story, but you must wade through a lot to determine what the story is.  It doesn’t have much direction as to the path of the story and that is both exciting and frustrating. Readers (myself included) sometimes like the little bones that the writers toss out in stories that does give you direction…I wish there were a few more however.

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Prophet (4) #38

The story is set in the future, but classic Youngblood characters do pop up over and over again.  Diehard is now a regular character along with Troll and this feature features an appearance by Suprema (who was a favorite of mine in Alan Moore’s classic run on Supreme).  It’s these tiny cameos which help anchor the story in the Image universe and are fun for readers who have been around awhile (and the promise of Badrock is coming).

The main story seems to be shaping up more.  The basic idea is that Old John Prophet and his crew is now teaming up with the rogue Brain-Mother crew led by Newfather.  The introduction of Brother John Agro also sets up another storyline which I’m sure will be woven into the main storyline at some point (but you never know with this comic).

Like the writing, the art is also very interesting and challenging.  The story features a lot of picture panels without dialogue.  You not only have to figure out what is going on from the writing, but from what you are seeing.  It isn’t easy, but it is fun.

I would argue that Prophet is one of the most challenging comics out there.  It is a story that needs intense focus, but it is sometimes difficult because part of the joy of the comic is just getting lost in it (and losing focus).  Prophet is one of those series that really benefits from trade paperbacks because it helps for you to read (and re-read) issues, but it also suffers from trade paperbacks because you forget some of what is going on by the time you get the next one.  Take a chance with Prophet for a weird and different sci-fi fantasy.  Prophet 3:  Empire is followed by Prophet 4:  Joining.

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Related Links:

Prophet 1:  Remission

Prophet 2:  Brothers

Author: JPRoscoe View all posts by
Follow me on Twitter @JPRoscoe76! Loves all things pop-culture especially if it has a bit of a counter-culture twist. Plays video games (basically from the start when a neighbor brought home an Atari 2600), comic loving (for almost 30 years), and a true critic of movies. Enjoys the art house but also isn't afraid to let in one or two popular movies at the same time.

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