Invincible 1: Family Matters

invincible volume 1 family matters cover trade paperback tpb
8.5 Overall Score
Story: 8/10
Art: 6/10

Great characters in a developing story

Doesn't hold up as stand-alone issues, I don't always love Walker's art

 
Comic Info

Comic Name:  Invincible

Publisher:  Image Comics

Writer:  Robert Kirkman

Artist:  Corey Walker

# of Issues:  4

Release Date:  2004

invincible-#1-first-issue

Invincible #1

Reprints Invincible #1-4 (January 2003-April 2003). Mark Grayson is a senior in high school. He works at a fast-food restaurant and likes hanging out with his friend William. The difference is that Mark’s father is the most powerful superhero on Earth…Omni-Man! When Mark begins developing powers, his plans to be the next great superhero might be possible. Now he’s getting use to his powers, battling alien invaders with his father, helping Teen Team, and stopping a teacher preying on students. It’s all in a day’s work for Invincible!

Written by Robert Kirkman and illustrated by Corey Walker, Invincible Volume 1: Family Matters was a big smash with critics and fans. Invincible 1: Family Matters is also included in the omnibus Invisible Ultimate Collection Volume 1.

Invincible first appeared in Tech Jacket #1 (October 2002) and then cameoed in Noble Causes: Family Secrets #3 (November 2002). Kirkman then introduced the Invincible series which gained quick popularity for its long running serialized stories and realistic portrayal of teens.

Invincible works because Mark Grayson and the supporting cast of characters are extremely likeable. Here, we’re just learning the characters and most of them aren’t developed making it actually kind of fun to go back and re-read some of these earlier issues. Mark immediately feels like a real, rounded character that has all the problems of a teenager. It is very melodramatic, but Dawson’s Creek style plots combine great with superhero angst.

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Invincible #3

The other thing Kirkman accomplishes in the series is that he begins to set up events that pay off issues down the line. Little gags like the trash bag thrown into the air in Invincible #1 comes into play much further in the series. Also major plotlines involving the alien invaders and the Teen Team seem like write-offs here, but really have an impact later. It is fun stuff like this which makes following the series a must.

Despite my love for Invincible, I don’t always love Walker’s art. It is pretty minimalistic and it would be interesting to see this comic with a better artist, though it could lose some of its charm. Another problem is that issue-to-issue Invincible is rather dull. It is reading the issues as a whole that makes them fun and enjoyable.

I like Invincible a lot and I’m rather surprised when Kirkman’s The Walking Dead picked up steam 2003 and became a hit series in 2010 that Invincible hasn’t headed to TV. The series is fun (and continues to be fun). I don’t always love Corey Walker’s minimalist art, but the story keeps me coming back. Invincible 1: Family Matters is followed by Invincible 2: Eight Is Enough.

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Invincible 2:  Eight Is Enough

Author: JPRoscoe View all posts by
Follow me on Twitter @JPRoscoe76! Loves all things pop-culture especially if it has a bit of a counter-culture twist. Plays video games (basically from the start when a neighbor brought home an Atari 2600), comic loving (for almost 30 years), and a true critic of movies. Enjoys the art house but also isn't afraid to let in one or two popular movies at the same time.

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