Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 1: Dungeon of Dread

dungeons and dragons endless quest book 1 dungeon of dread cover rose estes
7.0 Overall Score
Story: 6/10
Illustrations: 7/10

Nice introduction to roleplaying and fantasy for younger readers, fun illustrations

Not the most exciting fantasy series

 
Book Info

Book Title:  Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 1:  Dungeon of Dread

Publisher:  TSR Hobbies Inc.

Writer:  Rose Estes

Artist:  Jim Holloway

Release Date: June 1982

dungeons-&-dragons-endless-quest-book-1-dungeon-of-dread-review-rose-estes-tsr-choose-your-own-adventure-illustrations-demon

I choose not being stabbed through the heart by a demon

A human named Caric encounters a halfling named Laurus who tells tales of a dungeon full of riches and monsters.  Caric has agreed to now enter the deadly dungeon ruled by a wizard named Kalman.  With a warning at the gates to “Watch the water that is not water, and beware of the basilisk”, Caric and Laurus enter the dungeon…and set course for adventure!

Written by Rose Estes, Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 1:  Dungeon of Dread was the first volume in the popular Dungeons & Dragons version of the Choose Your Own Adventure series.  When it was released, the book was often packaged with other Endless Quest books in boxset collections.

Choose Your Own Adventure books were popular in the late ’70s and early ’80s.  It must be noted that at the time, roleplaying games were growing popular and video games had not evolved into something that provided a true roleplaying equivalent.  The Endless Quest books were a result of TSR’s education department to expand on the popular Dungeons & Dragons series and recruit new players.

dungeons-&-dragons-endless-quest-book-1-dungeon-of-dread-review-rose-estes-tsr-choose-your-own-adventure-illustrations-monkey

Nothing is sadder than a baboon crying in its beer

This volume of the series is a little easier to find the right path than some of the other volumes.  With a set enemy in the wizard Kalman, it is easy to know when you have “solved” the book.  The story smartly has some creepy elements and your character can (and often) dies.  This is an aspect of these series of books which for a younger reader is different since there is often little danger in books for children and as a kid reading these books, it was fun.

I always enjoyed the illustrations in the Endless Quest books.  The cover art by Larry Elmore was effective and the interior art by Jim Holloway provided enough motivation to have you read and reread to book to see how the pictures tied in to vary aspects of the story…it is a smart way to keep kids motivated.

Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 1:  Dungeon of Dread is a good first step in a way to get young readers interested in both fantasy and roleplaying games.  If you can find copies of the old series, it is worth checking out for younger readers or a fun trip back in time if you grew up with the books…you’ll find you still remember aspects of the adventures.  Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 1:  Dungeon of Dread was followed by Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 2:  Mountain of Mirrors.

Related Links:

Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 2:  Mountain of Mirrors

Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 3:  Pillars of Pentegarn

Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 4:  Return to Brookmere

Author: JPRoscoe View all posts by
Follow me on Twitter @JPRoscoe76! Loves all things pop-culture especially if it has a bit of a counter-culture twist. Plays video games (basically from the start when a neighbor brought home an Atari 2600), comic loving (for almost 30 years), and a true critic of movies. Enjoys the art house but also isn't afraid to let in one or two popular movies at the same time.

One Comment on "Dungeons & Dragons Endless Quest Book 1: Dungeon of Dread"

  1. Guest April 8, 2015 at 3:14 am - Reply

    Ah, memories. I loved Choose Your Own Adventure, which ensured that I’d love Endless Quest, too.

    I bought over ten copies of EQ and borrowed half a dozen more from the library.

    Then I lent out most of my titles to a friend, thinking that he’d enjoy them because he was into Dungeons & Dragons at the time.

    That was a huge mistake. Not only did he not read them; he tossed them when he moved. And he didn’t apologize.

     

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